Last edited by Kisho
Monday, July 27, 2020 | History

3 edition of Risky sexual behaviors among African-Americans found in the catalog.

Risky sexual behaviors among African-Americans

by Ernest H. Johnson

  • 221 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by Praeger in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States.,
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • AIDS (Disease) -- Risk factors -- United States.,
    • African Americans -- Health and hygiene.,
    • African Americans -- Sexual behavior.,
    • AIDS (Disease) -- United States -- Epidemiology.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references ([157]-173) and index.

      StatementErnest H. Johnson.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsRA644.A25 J63 1993
      The Physical Object
      Paginationx, 180 p. ;
      Number of Pages180
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1724777M
      ISBN 100275941620
      LC Control Number92028483

      Using an ecological resiliency perspective (Murry, Bynum, Brody, Willert, & Stephens, ) and a sample of African American single mother families, the current study examined protective factors (e.g., maternal religiosity, adolescent religiosity, & parenting behaviors) associated with decreased adolescent engagement in risky sexual : Shiahna M. Dye. different times as it relates to African Americans. For example, a program that results in significant improvements in risky sexual behaviors for African Americans at post-test, but has no impact at a one year follow-up would be rating as having mixed findings. A program that works for African AmericanFile Size: KB.

      Another recent study that examined the influence of mass media on eight potentially risky behaviors, including sexual intercourse, found that adolescents who had engaged in more risky behaviors listened to radio and watched music videos and movies on television more frequently than those who had engaged in fewer risky behaviors, independent of. (%) were among blacks/African Americans, 1, (%) among Hispanics/Latinos, and 1, (%) among whites. In the 12 states and nine large urban school districts, more risk behaviors were reported by male high school students who had sexual contact with .

      The U.S. Census Bureau reports particular demographic, social, and health conditions for African Americans. Population-wide, the African American community has a higher mortality rate from cancer and diabetes than the rest of the population, a higher infant mortality rate, and a lower vaccination. In “ Trends in Sexual Risk Behavior and Unprotected Sex among High School Students, – The Role of Substance Use ” (Journal of School Health, vol. 78, no. 11, November ), John E. Anderson and Trisha E. Mueller of the CDC find that adolescents who use drugs or alcohol are more likely to engage in risky sexual behaviors.


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Risky sexual behaviors among African-Americans by Ernest H. Johnson Download PDF EPUB FB2

The major purpose of this book is to examine the interrelationships among knowledge about the transmission of HIV/AIDS, condom use, drug use, history of sexually transmitted diseases, and other relevant factors that affect African-American males and females who engage in risky sexual by:   Risky Sexual Behavior.

Teens in this sample reported high rates of engaging in risky sexual behavior, placing them at great risk for HIV and other STDs (see Table I for frequencies of risky sexual behaviors stratified by age). Specifically, 78% ( of ) of teens reported that they had engaged in vaginal intercourse at least by: The major purpose of this book is to examine the interrelationships among knowledge about the transmission of HIV/AIDS, condom use, drug use, history of sexually transmitted diseases, and other relevant factors that affect African-American males and females who engage in risky sexual Range: $ - $ ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: x, pages ; 25 cm: Contents: 1.

Introduction Design and Methods of Inquiry Knowledge about AIDS among African-American Young Adults Multiple Sex Partners and Risky Sexual Behavior Sexually Transmitted Diseases among African-Americans Individuals Who Always Use Condoms: Their Attitudes.

We investigated Risky sexual behaviors among African-Americans book related to risky sexual behaviors among young African American men enrolled at historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs).

Methods. Analyses were based on data gathered from male freshmen enrolled at 34 HBCUs Cited by: Among African Americans, HIV is transmitted through high-risk sexual behavior (exclusive of injection drug use, male-to-male sexual contact, or prenatal exposure) in approximately 20% of infections among men and more than 50% of infections among women.

These findings underscore the importance of identifying the correlates of high-risk sexual Cited by:   Book Review; Published: 09 June Risky Sexual Behaviors Among African-Americans. By Ernest H. Johnson, Praeger Books, New York,pp., $ Carlton W Cited by: 42% of African Americans in the MSA lived in high- poverty censu s tracts, plac ing Mobile third in the nation in this measure of concentrated poverty (Jargowsky ).

Little research has examined the links between role status changes during the transition to adulthood and sexual behaviors that place African Americans at risk for sexually transmitted infections. Moreover, the mediating processes that explain these links, or protective factors that may buffer young adults from risky sexual behavior, are unknown.

African American young adults who had either Cited by:   Risky Sexual Behaviors Among African-Americans Risky Sexual Behaviors Among African-Americans Parks, Carlton Arch Sex Behav () – DOI /s BOOK REVIEW By Ernest H.

Johnson, Praeger Books, New York,pp., $ Carlton W. Parks Jr. Published online: 9 June Springer Science+Business. Violence, substance use, and unsafe sexual practices are major public health problems challenging today's urban African American youth. 1,2 Urban African American youth are at high risk for violence owing to exposure to violence in their communities.

They also experience more exposure, easy access, and daily pressure to use or traffic illicit drugs. Compared with white youth, African Cited by: Among the 3 dimensions of FSC, comfort significantly predicted sexual experience, information significantly predicted sexual attitude, and value significantly predicted sexual attitude and behaviors.

It was well established that HIV was spread primarily through sexual intercourse without barrier protection such as condoms. “Risky sex” occurred between men and between men and women.

ByHIV infection rates and deaths due to AIDS were in decline among White men in AIDS epi-centers, but continued among African : Benjamin P. Bowser. Each year, there are approximately 12 million new cases of sexually transmitted disease (STD) in the United States.1 STD prevalence is higher among blacks than among whites or Asians and Pacific Islanders—for some STDs, by as much as 30%.2 Inyear-old black males had a rate of gonorrhea that was about 20 times the rate of Native American or Hispanic males in the same age.

Consistent with research conducted by Cooper (), risky sexual behaviors are defined as those sexual behaviors that increase the likelihood of negative outcomes associated with such sexual conduct. This definition of STD's includes, but is not limited to, HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases such as gonorrhea and syphilis.

Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. (, February 25). Risky behaviors of gambling, sex linked in African-American youth. ScienceDaily. Culture and family processes play a salient role in the prevention of HIV risky sexual behaviors among both African Americans and Hispanics.

Despite the elevated rates of HIV risky sexual behaviors and the importance of culture and family, there is a dearth of culturally specific family interventions designed to prevent HIV among these by: 7.

A cross-sectional design was used. A nonprobabilistic convenience sample was recruited to determine the occurrence of risky sexual behaviors among middle-aged and older African American men (mean age = 46 years; age range = 40–68 years) who were diagnosed with HIV/ by: 8.

The goal of the proposed study is to better understand the neurophysiological framework behind the increasing levels of psychosocial stress and risky sexual behaviors amongst African American females in hopes of decreasing the number of new STI/HIV and PTSD.

-for African Americans: religion may be a protective factor against sexual behavior -religious adolescents tended to affiliate with peers who discourage permissive sexual behavior-having such peers was, in turn, associated with risky sexual behaviors **.

Having peers who exhibit negative behaviors — such as substance use and school truancy — increases the likelihood that a black youth will engage in high-risk sexual behaviors.

Condom Comparison Black men were more likely to use a condom in their last sexual encounter (73% did) relative to their white and Latino peers (where the usage rate. Data were collected on (1) the prevalence of risky sexual behaviors that occur within a couple and with concurrent sexual partners, (2) the STD .Results.

In the study sample (n = ), 64% of the adolescents had higher religiosity scores based on a 4-item scale (α).Results indicate that adolescents who had higher religiosity scores were significantly more likely to have higher self-efficacy in communicating with new, as well as steady male partners about sex; about STDs, HIV, and pregnancy prevention; and in refusing an unsafe Cited by: